The Rough Guide To World Music Volume 2

The Rough Guide to World Music is a magnificent book, capable of infinite interpretation. So how on earth does this CD, offered as a taster for Volume Two, manage to be such a travesty? Its not merely that some of its allegedly famous musicians dont figure in the book, nor that it ignores great stretches of the American and Asian musical maps. Its offence is this: while the book reflects a serious attempt to grasp music in all its forms, this record settles too often for homogenised pap. We get four or five ace tracks: Ruben Gonzalez, an acceptably nifty remix of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, some lovely Christian reggae from Vivian Jackson, and a gloriously untampered-with excerpt from sarod-king Ali Akbar Khan; that Aboriginal gadfly Archie Roachs song to his dead brother may come clad in country and Western garb, but its still a cry of personal and political pain. But we also get Bollywood schmaltz, club treatment for Uzbek singers and South Seas choirs, and soupy orchestral Navajo. Plus a bland liner note which manages to tell us the story of the long-exiled Chilean protest-group Inti-Illimani, without one mention of politics. --Michael Church

Helpful?
The Rough Guide To World Music Volume 2
Stats Overview
3.0 (1 Rate)
5
0%
rates
4
0%
rates
3
100%
rates
2
0%
rates
1
0%
rates
Add Your Rate:
Reviews (1):
CamRate - Music
Original Reviewer
The Rough Guide To World Music Volume 2
4 years ago

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rough-Guide-World-Music/dp/B00004VXEJ?SubscriptionId=AKIAIS3I5A33GTV7S27Q&tag=wwwcamratecom-21&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00004VXEJ The Rough Guide to World Music is a magnificent book, capable of infinite interpretation. So how on earth does this CD, offered as a taster for Volume Two, manage to be such a travesty? Its not merely that some of its allegedly famous musicians dont figure in the book, nor that it ignores great stretches of the American and Asian musical maps. Its offence is this: while the book reflects a serious attempt to grasp music in all its forms, this record settles too often for homogenised pap. We get four or five ace tracks: Ruben Gonzalez, an acceptably nifty remix of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, some lovely Christian reggae from Vivian Jackson, and a gloriously untampered-with excerpt from sarod-king Ali Akbar Khan; that Aboriginal gadfly Archie Roachs song to his dead brother may come clad in country and Western garb, but its still a cry of personal and political pain. But we also get Bollywood schmaltz, club treatment for Uzbek singers and South Seas choirs, and soupy orchestral Navajo. Plus a bland liner note which manages to tell us the story of the long-exiled Chilean protest-group Inti-Illimani, without one mention of politics. --Michael Church

Reply‚óŹ
Helpful?
User Image