The Rough Guide to Afro-Cuba: Continental Drift - Explosive Musical Connection

Fusion may be an overworked word, denoting an often dubious process, but The Rough Guide to Afro-Cuba should restore anyones faith in it. And history underpins it: Cuban dance rhythms originated in Africa, were transported during the slave trade to Cuba, were brought back to Africa by liberated slaves in the 19th century, and were reappropriated by indigenous African musicians in the 20th century. And at every stage in the process they were enriched and embellished. Permeated by rumba and mbalax rhythms, this lovely compilation reflects an astonishing constancy of texture between groups recorded in Cuba and groups recorded in Africa, and its inclusion of some rare vintage stuff--the Septeto Nacional, Balla et Ses Balladins, and the King of Highlife ET Mensah--deepens its historical dimension. Stand-out tracks are from Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca--wailing trumpets over hurrying percussion--and the impish-voiced Carlos Patato Valdes. But we also get the intricate charms of Orchestra Baobab and the magnificent sound of Sierra Maestra, Cubas finest son band. The notes are good, but why cant they give recording dates? So easy to do, so frustrating when omitted. --Michael Church

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The Rough Guide to Afro-Cuba: Continental Drift - Explosive Musical Connection
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CamRate - Music
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The Rough Guide to Afro-Cuba: Continental Drift - Explosive Musical Connection
4 years ago

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rough-Guide-Afro-Cuba-Continental-Connection/dp/B00005NBTL?SubscriptionId=AKIAIS3I5A33GTV7S27Q&tag=wwwcamratecom-21&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00005NBTL Fusion may be an overworked word, denoting an often dubious process, but The Rough Guide to Afro-Cuba should restore anyones faith in it. And history underpins it: Cuban dance rhythms originated in Africa, were transported during the slave trade to Cuba, were brought back to Africa by liberated slaves in the 19th century, and were reappropriated by indigenous African musicians in the 20th century. And at every stage in the process they were enriched and embellished. Permeated by rumba and mbalax rhythms, this lovely compilation reflects an astonishing constancy of texture between groups recorded in Cuba and groups recorded in Africa, and its inclusion of some rare vintage stuff--the Septeto Nacional, Balla et Ses Balladins, and the King of Highlife ET Mensah--deepens its historical dimension. Stand-out tracks are from Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca--wailing trumpets over hurrying percussion--and the impish-voiced Carlos Patato Valdes. But we also get the intricate charms of Orchestra Baobab and the magnificent sound of Sierra Maestra, Cubas finest son band. The notes are good, but why cant they give recording dates? So easy to do, so frustrating when omitted. --Michael Church

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