Rough Guide To Americana

To someone resistant to North American roots music, The Rough Guide to Americana will come as a pleasant surprise. As defined in Sylvie Simmonss excellent liner note, the title could equally well have been Cowpunk, Lo-Fi Country, Insurgent Country, or even No Depression, and indeed depression is the one thing that these 20 breezy tracks will be guaranteed to blow away. The guitar is their ubiquitous backing, assisted by banjo and bass, and their most characteristic tone is a sunny defiance. This even applies to Johnny Dowds comically ghoulish eve-of-execution song from Fort Worths thickly populated death row, and to the Gourds wickedly well-observed parody of hillbilly music, taking as its subject the matter of compulsive masturbation. When things get serious, these singers rise to the occasion--viz Suzie Ungerleiders plangent timbre, perfectly suited to her story of a flood that devastated a small Pennsylvania town in the 19th century. If youve listened to Neil Young or Dylan and the Byrds in 1970s mode, this music will seem familiar, but its actually not: while the superstars exerted themselves to revisit their roots--and got some of the way there these irresistible singers have never left them. --Michael Church

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CamRate - Music
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Rough Guide To Americana
2 years ago

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rough-Guide-Americana-Various-Artists/dp/B00005KIZ7?SubscriptionId=AKIAJOF43QDA3QLOVLJQ&tag=wwwcamratecom-21&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B00005KIZ7 To someone resistant to North American roots music, The Rough Guide to Americana will come as a pleasant surprise. As defined in Sylvie Simmonss excellent liner note, the title could equally well have been Cowpunk, Lo-Fi Country, Insurgent Country, or even No Depression, and indeed depression is the one thing that these 20 breezy tracks will be guaranteed to blow away. The guitar is their ubiquitous backing, assisted by banjo and bass, and their most characteristic tone is a sunny defiance. This even applies to Johnny Dowds comically ghoulish eve-of-execution song from Fort Worths thickly populated death row, and to the Gourds wickedly well-observed parody of hillbilly music, taking as its subject the matter of compulsive masturbation. When things get serious, these singers rise to the occasion--viz Suzie Ungerleiders plangent timbre, perfectly suited to her story of a flood that devastated a small Pennsylvania town in the 19th century. If youve listened to Neil Young or Dylan and the Byrds in 1970s mode, this music will seem familiar, but its actually not: while the superstars exerted themselves to revisit their roots--and got some of the way there these irresistible singers have never left them. --Michael Church

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